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Issues

Top Legislative Issues


Regulatory Reform

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must end the use of non-governmental, non-consensus standards in setting product procurement policies through its Environmentally Preferable Purchasing program (EPP).

THE ASK

•     Send a letter to Administrator Andrew Wheeler asking EPA to alter significantly or retract its “Recommendations of Specifications, Standards, and Ecolabels for Federal Purchasing” policy developed under its Environmentally Preferred Purchasing (EPP) program.

THE WHY

  • Regulatory reform is essential for the vinyl industry and a more sustainable society. Today, only a few insiders – not the public – get to determine which materials are more sustainable and, therefore, which products government agencies can select. Sustainability is about doing more with less: better environmental and natural resource stewardship in balance with economic and social due diligence. Considering the full social, environmental, and economic implications of EPA’s actions will enable all to make more informed decisions. EPA’s current EPP policy process circumvents traditional rulemaking, often inhibiting a full and balanced consideration of these life-cycle factors.
  • The vinyl industry is committed to addressing sustainable development across our industry, targeting the specific areas where we can make the most impact. With 10 billion people expected to live on the planet by 2050 and the underlying need to do more with less in light of depleting natural resources, vinyl is a material of choice for the many market segments served by our industry.

Trade

 U.S. Trade policies have the potential to severely impact vinyl-related businesses

THE ASK 

 THE WHY

  • International trade is essential for the vinyl industry and a more sustainable U.S. global economy. With abundant supplies of our two main feedstocks, salt and natural gas, vinyl products are among the most sustainable exports produced in the U.S.  With environmentally and socially preferred domestic manufacturing technology and a near-endless supply of raw materials, the U.S. is positioned to be a significant export of polyvinylchloride (PVC) net export leader for many years to come.
  • The vinyl industry is working together to address sustainable development across our industry, targeting the specific economic sectors where we can make the most impact.  With 10 billion people expected to live on the planet by 2050 and the underlying need to do more with less in light of depleting natural resources, PVC is a material of choice for the many market segments served by the industry, particularly for drinking water and wastewater pipes.  

Water Infrastructure

 Increase funding for water infrastructure programs and require open competition in designing and bidding on piping systems in order to stretch taxpayers’ dollars and lower local ratepayers’ costs.

THE ASK 

  • Cosponsor the Water Quality Protection and Job Creation Act of 2019 (HR 1497) which authorizes $22.5 B in new Federal Funding for Clean Water Infrastructure over the next five years.
  • Require open competition in designing and bidding on piping systems in order to stretch taxpayers’ dollars and lower local ratepayers’ costs.

 THE WHY

  • Drinking water and wastewater infrastructure improvements are essential for a more sustainable society.  Sustainability is about doing more with less: better environmental and natural resource stewardship in balance with economic and social due diligence.  Innovative PVC pipe provides more sustainable solutions by improving the durability and lifecycle performance of pipe systems, reducing energy use, and lowering costs for ratepayers.
  • The vinyl industry is working together to address sustainable development across our industry, targeting the specific economic sectors where we can make the most impact.  With 10 billion people expected to live on the planet by 2050 and the underlying need to do more with less in light of depleting natural resources, PVC is a material of choice for the many market segments served by the industry, particularly for drinking water and wastewater pipes.  
  • PVC pipe is an answer to the pipe corrosion and poor performance problems with metal pipe.  An independent and peer-reviewed life cycle assessment concludes PVC has lower environmental impacts from a life cycle and carbon footprint perspective – lower embodied energy, lower use-phase energy and longer life attributes compared to other pipe materials.  The PVC pipe design life is 100+ years.  Throughout this period, the energy required to pump water through PVC pipe remains constant because PVC pipe walls are smooth and do not degrade over time.  This generates overall lifecycle cost savings and a lower carbon footprint compared to alternative materials that require more pumping energy over time due to corrosion, leaks and internal degradation.  According to a March 2018 study of North American piping systems, PVC pipes have fewer breaks and require less maintenance than pipes made of other materials.